You’re out on bail. Finally. It seemed like the Judge was never going to agree to give you this chance and grant you bail. So this means you’re free, right? You’re out of jail for the time being, and you can do whatever you want. Well, not exactly. Even if you are out of jail on bail, there are some regulations that you have to follow. If you violate your bail you can be in breach of bail which could jeopardize your case and your future. If you are out on bail, it is important that you fully understand what is expected of you during this time so that you do not end up in breach of bail.

If you are out of jail on bail, there are still serious implications of being in breach of your bail. There are a few major ways that you can breach your terms of bail that you have to be aware of so that you can avoid them. The first major way that you can be in breach of bail is if you have restrictions on your bail. If you are on bail with restrictions and you do something that the court has told you not to do, you will be violating your bail agreement. For example, if a condition of your bail was to remain in the state until your trial, and you take a trip out of the state or country, you will be in breach of your bail conditions. Another major way that you can be in breach of bail is if you fail to appear in court at your appointed time.

If this is the case, you can be arrested on failure to appear charges, as this is a crime that is taken seriously by Judges. Remember that even just forgetting about your court date is enough for you to be charged with failure to appear in court. Forgetting your court date is not a valid excuse to not be in court so make sure that you remember when and where you are asked to appear! One other way that you can be in breach of your bail agreement is if it comes to light that you lied about information related to your bail. For example, if you use money that you obtained illegally for your bail, or if you gave false information that was used in relation to your bail, you will breach your bail agreement.

So, what would happen if you did breach your bail agreement? If you are found breaching bail, this will give the police reason to arrest you. An arrest warrant can be issued for your arrest and the police can take you into custody until you go before the court. At this point, a Judge will either reset your bail with different conditions or revoke your right to bail. This means that you will have to remain in custody until your trial.

If you realize that you have breached your bail agreement, it is in your best interest to turn yourself in. If you simply made a mistake and turn yourself in, this will show good character to the Judge and will increase your chances of having your bail reset. For more advice on how to deal with a breach of bail, you can contact Connecticut Bail Bonds.